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Creating a travel photography checklist is not easy. You need your camera (or cameras), lens, a tripod, memory card, filter, etc. And you also need to pack clothes and personal items. But you can't even bring a kitchen sink, so what do you bring, and what do you leave? In this article you will get to know about the items that you should keep with you and which you should leave. We will also tell you why this is so.

Camera equipment for a travel photographer Let's start with the most important item on the list! Just as you prioritize getting photos at your meal time, similarly you also want to prioritize camera equipment over everything else! right? So what should be in your bag, and are there extras that would be great for you? Essential photography equipment

This is a must…never forget to bring a camera.....

....or two....

…or three. :D
Photo by Ethan Hoover / Unsplash

1. Camera Body

Whatever camera body you have, you want to bring it with you! Which brand is not a camera, it is clear in this article that all of them have their own merits. However, there are moves towards mirrorless cameras, and their light weight is definitely appealing to a travel photographer.

Photo by Ning Shi / Unsplash

2. Camera lens

In the interest of keeping the weight down, stick with one or two lenses. A good setup here would be a good quality wide angle lens, and then a super zoom to cover its focal length such as 18–300 million lenses. Too many photographers will bring another lens. However this will add weight, so we will discuss in additional equipment.

Fujica 1980s
Photo by Zoltan Tasi / Unsplash

3. Tripod

Is a tripod an essential piece of photography equipment for travel photography? This is if you want to get good quality photos that compare with your peers. The ability to expose over a long period of time and potentially bracket your images is also important. Those wishing to use post-processing techniques such as digital blending actually require bracketed images taken from static tripods. Choose a tripod that is sturdy, yet small enough to travel and can fit in your checked luggage.

4. Filter

These seem to be next to the room, not bulky, and give you lots of artistic options for your photography. You want to bring a circular polarization filter and a strong neutral density filter as a minimum.

5. Camera cleaning

Dust, sand and detritus are an everyday concern for travel photographers. The best places to take pictures often dirty your equipment. So bring a microfiber lens cleaner, and a blower.

6. releasable

The same logic for size and weight for filters can be applied to cable releases. You will need this for your long exposure photography, and photographers who want to expose for more than 30 seconds using the bulb function cannot do so without a cable release.

7. Memory card and card reader

Keep enough memory cards with you for your entire trip. Should you have an external hard drive and computer you may be able to upload photos on a daily basis, and return them. Otherwise you will need enough storage space from your memory card to cover your entire journey, albeit longer. At the very least you need to make sure that you have enough space in your memory card so that you do not run out of space by the end of the day.

8. Battery and Battery Charger

Adequate battery power is important for your trip. And if you are going far away then you will not be able to recharge easily. Traveling in the jungle means managing your power. A visit to Mongolia many years ago taught me this because there are many places where there is no power. For most trips, however, it is sufficient to carry two batteries, and it is important to charge both each night.

It’s raining
Photo by Gabriele Diwald / Unsplash

9.Rain Protection

It is not a good idea to wet your camera, even if its weather is sealed. It is a good idea to take protection for your camera and for your camera bag. Most camera bags will come in some form of wet weather protection. You will need to buy protection for your camera, or you can try using a plastic bag wrapped around it, with a rubber band that can be mounted on the camera lens.

10.Khera Bag

Finally where to put all of this camera gear? Why a nice bag of course! It should be of a decent size, and has the ability to attach a tripod to the rear so that you can carry this stuff in your bag.

Optional photography equipment

1. Additional Camera Body

This is not optional if you are on a paid assignment. It is necessary to have another body. And having a backup body is never a bad idea.

2. Special lens

Additional lenses will give you more flexibility. The 50mm prime lens with large aperture is excellent for street, portrait and low light photography. A fisheye lens can be fun to use as well.

Purple Lightning Dee Why
Photo by Jeremy Bishop / Unsplash

3. Lighting Equipment

Adding light to a scene via strobe actually gives you maximum control over the photo. This can be great for fill light. However, a rogue flash-bender like a radio trigger, receiver, and some types of light modifiers give you a chance to experiment. Turning off the camera's flash allows you to create great side or rim lights for your portrait work.

Mavic Magic
Photo by david henrichs / Unsplash

4. Drone

There may come a time when it becomes a necessary tool. Creating footage unlike still photos would probably say it already. The ability to take photos from any angle and get overhead photos will really boost your portfolio. With many magazines ready to publish photos from drones, one drawback right now is the quality of these pictures. You also have to be aware of the legal side of flying drones, with some countries actually emphasizing the practice.

5. Reflector Disc

A folding reflector disc is a good choice or complement to any lighting gear you want to bring with you. They are not heavy or large, and will allow you to use natural light more effectively in your portrait photos.